Root Canal Treatments for children

Young children can lose milk teeth and even immature permanent teeth when the pulp or the living tissue inside a tooth, becomes infected. This is often the result of trauma or tooth decay and creates a special problem for the child.

The milk teeth provide important guides for the newly developing permanent teeth that will replace them. And Without primary teeth to guide them in, permanent teeth tend to emerge in a crooked fashion, often becoming tilted or crowded because of inadequate space. This can result in bite problems that may require extensive orthodontic treatment later.

Unlike its hard outer surface, the soft pulp inside the tooth is rich in blood vessels and nerves. Problems in this area are often signaled by tooth sensitivity and pain. When these symptoms occur, radiographs (x-rays) are often necessary to confirm that the pulp is diseased, or dying. That's when treatment is needed, before an abscess or further infection can develop.

In severe cases, the tooth may need to be removed, and a space maintainer installed to fill the gap. But many times, space maintainers don't fully restore the tooth's functionality. Plus, they are susceptible to coming loose and must be monitored constantly.

Root Canal Treatments for children

If possible, other treatment methods are preferred, such as:

  • Indirect pulp treatment. If pulp damage is minimal, it's possible to remove most of the decay (but not the pulp), apply an antibiotic, and then seal the tooth up again; that's referred to as an “indirect” treatment.
  • Pulpotomy. Alternatively, if decay is limited to the upper portion of the pulp, we may recommend a “pulpotomy.” This involves removing the damaged part of the pulp, stabilizing the remaining healthy portion, and then disinfecting and sealing the tooth. This “partial” root canal is a time-tested technique that's successful in many cases.
  • Pulpectomy. If pulp tissue is infected through the entire tooth structure, a pulpectomy may be needed, which requires the removal of all pulp tissue. The canals are then disinfected, shaped, then filled and sealed with inert material. Afterwards, the crown (visible part) of the tooth will be restored. This resembles traditional root canal therapy, with a crucial difference: The sealant we use in children is capable of being dissolved by the body. That way, when it's time for a permanent tooth to erupt, the baby tooth's roots can be naturally absorbed and tooth development can proceed normally.

Preparing for Your Child's Root Canal Treatment

As you probably already know, most of the legends you may have heard about root canal therapy simply aren't true. In fact, the procedure generally causes little discomfort, but is quite successful in relieving tooth pain! We are adept at using anesthesia to block the sensation of pain, and are experienced in calming the fears of young ones. While it's understandable that you may be nervous, it will help if you don't let your child pick up on your own anxiety. A calming voice and a gentle touch can do much to relieve stress.